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MLB Survey Asks Fans if They’re Republicans or Democrats

Major League Baseball (MLB) is now questioning fans about political affiliation in their new post-game survey about the ballpark experience.

MLB is under new scrutiny as a new survey shows fans are being about political affiliation in a ballpark experience in a post-game survey. In a report from National Review, MLB claims the questions asked regarding political affiliations are “part of the extensive fan surveys MLB is conducting this year around the ballpark experience.”

The league claims the surveys are for are to try trying to “gain knowledge about fan perceptions, preferences, and behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic.” Of course, according to a recent poll done by Morning Consult, it was found, their favorability levels have completely collapsed within the Republican base.

For pro-sport Republicans, rating collapsed 35 percent, down from 47 percent to 12 percent in only a month. The poll showed the MLB used to have the “highest net favorability rating among Republicans of the four major sports leagues before the All-Star Game decision,” Morning Consult noted.

This happened as MLB earlier this month announced they would be moving their 2021 season All-Star game from Georgia to Colorado in the wake of Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp (R) signing voter integrity laws into place. They received blowback from Democrats spreading misinformation about the new laws, which resulted in the MLB giving in to political pressure and announced they would be moving their 2021 season All-Star game from Georgia to Colorado. A report found that the economic impact on Georgia’s businesses from the move could be between $37 million and $190 million.

According to the report, MLB officials are arguing that moving the game from Georgia and their cratering favorability numbers are not two in the same. Though the league also claims the question regarding attendees’ political affiliation starting during the 2020 postseason.

Their post-game survey is drawing some scrutiny from the Republicans for why the league is asking these questions. According to the report, MLB claims “the results of the surveys – which are sent via email – aren’t tied to any individual accounts” but are intending to “be used to determine broad trends” within the fans.

In a prepared statement, the MLB said:

“The research has shown that a person’s self-identified political affiliation often impacts their views about the pandemic, and therefore respondents’ views regarding returning to the ballpark. … Since we are in the midst of the pandemic, this is valuable information for our clubs to understand the views of their fans about attending games.”

The league claimed this is the third year surveys are being sent to fans asking about their experience but claims that “the league added a new set of questions about fan comfort about returning to the ballpark in the pandemic.” In a screenshot obtained by National Review, after a recent Washington Nationals game, their survey asked questions regarding the pandemic, like how the safety protocols for coronavirus were implemented and what percentage of the fans obeyed the mask requirements. The survey “also includes the political affiliation question.”

“Taking the survey and answering that question are completely voluntary,” the MLB said according to the report, adding, fans were given the option in the survey to use a “Third Party, Independent, ‘I’d prefer not to say,’ or skip the question – or the survey – altogether.”

Additionally, a poll found an overwhelming majority (67 percent) agreed MLB relocation from Atlanta was driven by “politics and publicity.” In comparison, 33 percent said it was driven by a “genuine concern for voters in Georgia.” More findings showed, voters who are familiar with the Georgia voting law, the survey found, 52 percent support the Georgia voter integrity bill. Moreover, 71 percent of respondents said they were “more supportive” of the law after hearing what was in the bill.

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