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Tourist finds tiny diamond that’s worth £22k – and is allowed to keep it

Noreen Wredberg found a tiny yellow stone in the Crater of Diamonds State Park that turned out to be a diamond worth over £22,000 – and she was allowed to keep it

A tourist found a tiny diamond that turned out to be worth £22,000

A tourist who found a tiny yellow stone on the ground was shocked when it turned out to be a diamond worth over £22,000 – and she was allowed to keep it.

Noreen Wredberg visited the Crater of Diamonds State Park in Arkansas, US, where she found the tiny stone after searching for around 40 minutes with her husband.

She initially didn’t know what the stone was but picked it up anyway, and despite being the size of a ‘jellybean’, the stone turned out to be worth £22,000 ($30,000) as it was a 4.38-carat diamond.

Noreen had paid just £7.30 ($10) to search the 37-acre field, as it is a diamond mine that is open to the public, and was allowed to keep the precious stone for herself.



Noreen Wredberg, from California, was allowed to keep the diamond
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Image:

Arkansas State Parks)




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She said: “I didn’t know it was a diamond then, but it was clean and shiny, so I picked it up.

“We really didn’t think we would find one, let alone something that big.”

Talking to the Independent, David Allen of Purely Diamonds, said: “A rough diamond of this carat weight could get anywhere between 3.00 to 3.50 carat as a polished diamond.

“A diamond of this size would retail at anything from $20k to $30k depending on the intensity of the yellow. The more vivid and intense the colour of yellow the more valuable it becomes.”







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Thousands of diamonds have been found at the park since 1906, with the largest being a 16.37-carat stone discovered in 1975.

Waymon Cox, from the park, said: “Diamonds are somewhat heavy for their size and lack static electricity, so dirt doesn’t stick to them.

“When rain uncovers a larger diamond and the sun comes out, its reflective surface is often easy to see.”

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