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Trainer David Flood called vet “a clown” after his horse was assessed for injury

Kendergarten Kop had been struck into on its left-hind while competing at Wolverhampton races. Flood was handed a £1,000 fine at a British Horseracing Authority hearing

A clip of CCTV footage, seen at the British Horseracing Authority disciplinary hearing, showed Flood heading to Wolverhampton Racecourse stable office

A trainer who called a vet “a clown” after his horse picked up an injury at the track has been fined £1,000.

David Flood reported post-race at Wolverhampton on March 13 that his ten-time winner Kendergarten Kop had been struck into on its left-hind and required veterinary assistance.

CCTV footage, seen by the panel at the British Horseracing Authority disciplinary hearing, showed him approaching the stable office for around 23 seconds, after a vet had assessed the horse.

Flood told the enquiry he was “frightened” that the horse would not put his foot on the ground, was losing some blood – and he expected quicker assistance.

The trainer said “emotions were running high” when he approached the office, spoke to and pointed at the vet.

“I remember calling her a clown,” he added.



The incident happened after horse Kendergarten Kop (pictured winning at Lingfield) picked up an injury in a race at Wolverhampton
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Image:

Racingfotos.com)




The vet was said to have been feeling “threatened and intimidated” by Flood while doing her job at the racecourse.

Kendergarten Kop recovered and returned to the track two weeks after the Wolverhampton race.

Panel chairman James O’Mahony said: “Most significantly, perhaps, he (Flood) agreed in evidence before us that he said words to this effect, if not precisely, ‘I’ve dealt with people like you before and I’ve blown them away’.









“We’re sure he didn’t mean in actual fact to make a threat but that could be taken as a threat and that kind of language is utterly unacceptable and makes the position more serious. We do accept, as is clear from the CCTV evidence, that he was pointing and we conclude that his demeanour was aggressive.

“We are sure that, in so far as he lost it, there was genuine and real concern for the welfare of the horse in his charge. Having said that, people have got to be treated with respect and this kind of language is against the rules and totally unacceptable.”



Kendergarten Kop recovered and returned to the track two weeks later
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Image:

Getty)




Flood, who has had 66 runners this year, was fined £1,000 at the conclusion of the case.

Representing himself, he suggested it was “good luck” and down to Kendergarten Kop’s constitution that he healed quickly – and could race again in a fortnight.

But O’Mahony said there were no welfare concerns with regards to the case.

“I should make it clear that our unanimous finding is that there is no legitimate criticism whatsoever of the veterinary officer in terms of her integrity, her ability or how she treated this matter,” he stated.


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